Famous type: The fight over the Doves

typography, history, font, london, dove, doves, thames, type

That painstaking process is similar to the technique Cobden-Sanderson and Walker used to create the Doves type, itself a confection of two earlier designs. Doves owes most to the type of Nicholas Jenson, a Venetian printer from the 15th century whose clear and elegant texts shunned the gothic blackletter favoured by print’s early pioneers. A few letters were added, and others redrawn. The arrow-straight descender of its lower case ‘y’ divides critics; purists lament the thick crossbar of the upper case ‘H’. Most people neither notice nor care. “No more graceful Roman letter has ever been cut and cast,” opined A.W. Pollard, a contemporary critic, in the Times. Simon Garfield, a modern writer, celebrates its rickety form, which looks “as if someone had broken into the press after hours and banged into the compositor’s plates.”

http://www.economist.com/news/christmas-specials/21591793-legendary-typeface-gets-second-life-fight-over-doves

A snow covered street in Kensington, Brooklyn, after another wintery day/one of the parrots Natalie is currently living with in…

A snow covered street in Kensington, Brooklyn, after another wintery day/one of the parrots Natalie is currently living with in Caracas. This bird has a huge vocabulary of Venezuelan slang and none of it is polite.
We are @NatalieKeyssar, an American photographer from New York in Caracas, and @VeronicaSanchis, a Venezuelan photographer from Caracas in New York. #echosight #doubleexposure #montage #multiexposure #collab #blend #mashup #caracas #newyork #rudebird by echosight (via http://instagram.com/p/zZ7ewlpIPK/)

GCHQ also claimed the ability to manipulate the billing servers of cell companies to “suppress” charges in an effort to conceal…

“GCHQ also claimed the ability to manipulate the billing servers of cell companies to “suppress” charges in an effort to conceal the spy agency’s secret actions against an individual’s phone. Most significantly, GCHQ also penetrated “authentication servers,” allowing it to decrypt data and voice communications between a targeted individual’s phone and their telecom provider’s network. A note accompanying the slide asserted that the spy agency was “very happy with the data so far and [was] working through the vast quantity of product.””

The Great SIM Heist: How Spies Stole the Keys to the Encryption Castle (viaiamdanw)