“Science and engineering today, however, is focused on things like synthetic biology or artificial intelligence, where the…

oscillator:

“Science and engineering today, however, is focused on things like synthetic biology or artificial intelligence, where the problems are massively complex. These problems exceed our ability to stay within the domain of the artificial, and make it nearly impossible for us to divide them into existing disciplines. We are finding that we are more and more able to design and deploy directly into the domain of “nature” and in many ways “design” nature. Synthetic biology is obviously completely embedded in nature and is about our ability to “edit nature.” However, even artificial intelligence, which is in the digital versus natural realm, is developing its relationship to the study of the brain beyond merely a metaphorical one. We find that we must increasingly depend on nature to guide us through the complexity and the unknowability (with our current tools) that is our modern scientific world.”

What Happened After Zappos Got Rid of Workplace Hierarchy

The Atlantic, holocracy, heirarchy, work, organisation, research, psychology

recent research seems to indicate that flattening workplace hierarchy is not only much more complicated than it seems, but that people prefer a pecking order. One Stanford study found that egalitarian work structures were disorienting. Workers found hierarchical companies were more predictable, and therefore preferable, because it was easy to figure out who did what and how compensation should be doled out. Another Stanford paper, which looked at why hierarchical structures in the workplace have such staying power, concluded perhaps the obvious: Hierarchies work. They are practical and psychologically comforting.

http://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2016/01/zappos-holacracy-hierarchy/424173/

Google, Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex, Nekoma, North Dakota, October, 2012 This is what the missile site of the…

bremser:

Google, Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex, Nekoma, North Dakota, October, 2012

This is what the missile site of the previous post looks like from the road. From the blueprints, the pyramid structure is about 75 feet / 23 meters tall (the structure continues below the berm). Cold War Tourist.com offers some photos of what the complex looks like inside recently. The very bottom of the page indicates the missile site was up for sale and, remarkably, was purchased by the Spring Creek Hutterite Colony (a group with some similarities to the Mennonites), for a sum of $530,000 USD. The government was generous enough to offer to pay for the extensive environmental cleanup. Click through the source to experience the drive-by, it’s a beautiful location, with the exhaust towers contrasting with the delicate windmills.

IJsseloog is an artificial island used as a depository to store polluted silt in the middle of the IJssel River in Flevoland,…

dailyoverview:

IJsseloog is an artificial island used as a depository to store polluted silt in the middle of the IJssel River in Flevoland, Netherlands. Silt is granular material, larger than sand but smaller than clay, that may occur as soil or sediment suspended in water. IJsseloog can hold 20 million cubic metres of silt.

52°36′N 5°45′E

www.dailyoverview.com

Automatic Picture Transmission (called APT) that was flown on Nimbus I reduced the time required and the cost of getting…

stml:

Automatic Picture Transmission (called APT) that was flown on Nimbus I reduced the time required and the cost of getting photographic information from a satellite to local weather forecasters. The four pictures at the right were received at Wallops Island, Va.

F. W. REICHELDERFER, former Chief of the U.S. Weather Bureau, wrote of them: “In this four-frame sequence, Nimbus I reveals many things about the weather in a 900-mile swath from Venezuela to the Canadian Arctic as viewed on August 29, 1964, from orbit approximately 550 statute miles from Earth. Through APT, the local or regional weather forecaster receives pictures of the cloud arrays as the satellite passes overhead. APT receivers are fairly simple and inexpensive.

“The two top pictures show clouds typical of systems of fronts. In mid-latitudes and the subarctic, warm fronts produce cloud ‘decks’ of cirrostratus and altostratus. Cold fronts produce convective cumulus and line-squall cumulonimbus. Intermediate frontal forms give the complex combinations of cloud forms and arrays seen in the pictures-their orientations and shapes being indicative of different wind currents, etc.

“The third picture looks down upon historic Hurricane Cleo over South Carolina and Georgia. The characteristic spiral bands of clouds first seen in full by rocket and satellite photos make it easy for satellites to discover tropical cyclones far at sea outside the usual networks of ship reports.

"In the fourth picture the many cumulus ‘streets’ often found in the trade winds can be seen; also southward are the cloud masses of an intertropical convergence zone.

"Perhaps most promising for future weather analysis and forecasting is the increasing study of clouds and their arrays as symptoms’ and thus diagnostic means for identifying atmospheric dynamic systems which make the weather.”

Source: NASA

The river.

wchambliss:

There’s too much to say about this latest trip. As Hesse put it in Siddhartha: “The river is everywhere.” Brad Garrett and I are talking about co-authoring a book about ten of our riparian adventures, so I may get a few solid thoughts down on paper at some point. For now, though, my mind is kaleidoscoping with infrastructure details (ingresses, especially; always ingresses), geometries, geographies, building materials, fleeting impressions…

Stevie Nicks singing, “When the rain washes you clean you’ll know, you’ll know…” as I drove into the city. Jumping a locked gate in the pre-dawn hush at the source of the river — and then every other barrier we encountered before hitting Universal City security. Fake trees disguising telco infrastructure: palm, pine, and eucalyptus. Climbing a stone wall to get a better look at Starfleet Academy. An empty parking lot beneath which 18 nuclear missiles were siloed until quite recently. Drinking whiskeys old enough to legally drink themselves. Will Self’s unexpected cameo at the Ace Hotel before a tray of room service champagne and our addled realization that all the records we liked best we had played at the wrong speed. Being guided through the ephemera of Bowtie Parcel by local artists with a powerfully strong sense of place. Buckaroo Bonzai’s logo on a warehouse (which makes sense, given that we started at the Starbucks of Rocketdyne – one of Pynchon’s Yoyodyne models). The privilege of observing nature with a scientist whose mind moves at 200 mph (and who continuously, non-confrontationally challenged suppositions with small thought experiments). Deb Chachra explaining emotional labor to me as we peed around the walls of a locked public restroom in a park. Being told by an Uber driver we looked like bank robbers (whether it was emotional labor or not). Dawn on the rooftop of an abandoned building in Downey. Anarchist infrastructure historian Adam Rothstein’s heavily annotated Thomas Guide, his impeccable route finding, a perfectly timed Benjamin quip, and his savage sentences re: Griffith J. Griffith (from a book-length project on California water he’s been working on). A mysterious government pickup truck, laden with chopped wood, driving at speed through the river. Bridge graff of a shadow coyote pack annotated: “Fuck the other side.” A guy in bright red leathers popping a wheelie on his motorcycle, tearing hell down the bike path toward Long Beach. A guy who had lashed his gear and himself into the girders beneath a bridge with a web of cables. A guy in an electric wheelchair who drove against traffic with three leashed pugs mushing ahead of him, blasting a tiny radio, then hopping up to walk into the liquor store. An old guy with a wispy Fu Manchu, ponytail, and sailor’s cap who shouted, “Close that FUCKING door!” at us, then went back to contemplating his horchata, statue-like. The peregrine falcon that shot out at me from the bushes. The corkscrew staircase between I-5 and the 110 at the confluence of Arroyo Seco and the river. A decapitated Mickey Mouse, its body twisted at the bottom of a cliff, as downtown LA came into clear view. Going garbage Tarzan on trash island. Swinging on the Tree of Woe in a pasture behind Disney’s animation studio. Talk of indigenous lizard people. Horse favelas. All of the amazing readings en route — but especially when a flock of pigeons circled overhead, ominously, as London-based geographer Harriet Hawkins read via Skype from and about Lewis MacAdams; and how Lucy Lippard’s Undermining on the subject of Spiral Jetty dissolved into whorls of razor wire separating Compton from the river. Brad recovering his balance after slipping on bird shit in a no-fall situation. The swaying, rusted catwalk we both ventured out onto. Ceremonies at the Mulholland fountain: a water offering, sigils, the naming of names. And a last group photograph, snapped by a bearded fisherwoman with the Queen Mary and Astronaut Islands behind us.

It wasn’t perfect. Despite lugging a heavy, 30-year-old raft >50 miles, we never put it into the water. Despite carrying full kit, and discovering ideal sites both days, we didn’t camp. But we did wade into the river beyond the 6th Street Viaduct at dusk and slosh it for miles through a concrete box canyon in a drizzling rain on the phase boundary of real danger. And we traversed the concrete desert south of Vernon, with commercial logistics operating on both sides of us, relentlessly, under sodium lights, in supernal silence. Unstable memories of the journey are already starting to decay, irradiating my insomnia. But that night, at least, will have a half-life like U-238.

12) San Francisco – Fort Mason Center for Arts & Culture, 2 Marina Boulevard at Buchanan Street, San Francisco, CA 94123,…

12) San Francisco – Fort Mason Center for Arts & Culture, 2 Marina Boulevard at Buchanan Street, San Francisco, CA 94123, USA
13) Wellington - Pataka Art+Museum, Cnr Parumoana & Norrie Streets, Porirua, Wellington, Porirua City 5240, New Zealand.
14) Massachusetts – MASS MoCA (Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art), MASS MoCA Way, North Adams, MA 01247, USA.
15)  Sydney – Art Gallery of New South Wales, Art Gallery Road, The Domain, Sydney NSW 2000, Australia.
16) Toronto – Art Gallery of Ontario, 317 Dundas Street West, Toronto Ontario, Canada M5T 1G4
17)  Los Angeles – The Museum of Contemporary Art, Geffen Contemporary at MOCA, 152 N Central Ave., Los Angeles, CA 90012, USA
18) Seattle – Asian Art Museum,1400 East Prospect Street, Seattle, WA, 98112. USA
12. Jan. 2016
Lego announces on it’s website that as of January 1st, the Lego Group no longer asks for the thematic purpose when selling large quantities of Lego bricks for projects:
“The LEGO Group has adjusted the guidelines for sales of Lego bricks in very large quantities.
Previously, when asked to sell very large quantities of Lego bricks for projects, the Lego Group has asked about the thematic purpose of the project. This has been done, as the purpose of the Lego Group is to inspire children through creative play, not to actively support or endorse specific agendas of individuals or organizations.
However, those guidelines could result in misunderstandings or be perceived as inconsistent, and the Lego Group has therefore adjusted the guidelines for sales of Lego bricks in very large quantities.
As of January 1st, the Lego Group no longer asks for the thematic purpose when selling large quantities of Lego bricks for projects. Instead, the customers will be asked to make it clear - if they intend to display their Lego creations in public - that the Lego Group does not support or endorse the specific projects.” by aiww (via https://www.instagram.com/p/BAefiH_KD37/)

Mount Taranaki, also known as Mount Egmont, is an active stratovolcano on the west coast of New Zealand’s North Island. An…

dailyoverview:

Mount Taranaki, also known as Mount Egmont, is an active stratovolcano on the west coast of New Zealand’s North Island. An incredible change in vegetation is sharply delineated between the national forest that encircles the volcano and the surrounding land comprised of intensively-farmed dairy pastures.

39°17′47″S 174°03′53″E

www.dailyoverview.com

La photographe Amanda Elledge.

trou-noir-collectif:

“Née de l'union de deux ex-hippies aux USA en 1978, je vis à Lille depuis 12 ans. J’ai eu une enfance de rêve dans la campagne américaine, j'ai grandi dans la nature et la liberté, ce qui a sûrement donné naissance à mon imagination mais également à mon esprit de solitude.”

“Toujours dans l'envie d'évoluer et d'apprendre, je suis à nouveau étudiante (en analyses biologiques et biochimiques), ce qui explique cette passion dans mes photos pour les textures organiques et les couches multiples qui me rappelle la complexité du monde vivant qui nous entoure.”

“ Inspirée par une amie photographe peu après mon arrivé en France, j'ai commencé par prendre des photos de la vie quotidienne pour lutter contre l'ennui de la routine. Puis, il y a quelques années, quand ce genre de photo a saturé ce milieu, je me suis concentré plus sur le côté artistique voire obscur/expérimental de la photographie.”

“Dans un monde qui aime opposer la photographie analogue et digitale, ça ne me dérange pas du tout de mélanger et manipuler ces deux techniques dans le but de créer des images qui vivent dans le flou, sans pouvoir déterminer quel appareil photo a été utilisé et sans respecter les règles standards  de prise de vue.”


“En ce moment, je suis surtout intéressée par la dégradation forcée de l'image à travers différentes méthodes post-traitement, comprenant le scanning et l'impression répétitive. J'ai toujours été plus attirée par les motifs imprévisibles créés par le hasard et la nature et j'essaie d'exprimer cette beauté que l'on trouve dans ces imperfections à travers mes images.”

“J'ai lu un commentaire laissé sur un des comptes en lignes disant de mes photos qu'elles ressemblaient à des « rêves oubliés en se réveillant et dont on essaie de se souvenir. » I think that says it all.”

Amanda Elledge
flickr.com/photos/x99elledge

x99elledge.tumblr.com

The clouds in many 19th-century European paintings look drastically different than those in the 18th century. There are layers…

hyperallergic:

The clouds in many 19th-century European paintings look drastically different than those in the 18th century. There are layers to their texture, with whisps of cirrus clouds flying over billowing cumulus, and stratus hovering low. Clouds weren’t classified by type until 1802, and their subsequent study influenced artists from John Constable to J. M. W. Turner.

How the Naming of Clouds Changed the Skies of Art

Whaling and Fin-tech

The Economist, economics, business, whaling, technology, investment, syndicates, incentives, history

The only reason that anyone could be induced to take part in such a dangerous business was the fabulous profit that could be made. Gideon Allen & Sons, a whaling syndicate based in New Bedford, Massachusetts, made returns of 60% a year during much of the 19th century by financing whaling voyages—perhaps the best performance of any firm in American history. It was the most successful of a very successful bunch. Overall returns in the whaling business in New Bedford between 1817 and 1892 averaged 14% a year—an impressive record by any standard. New Bedford was not the only whaling port in America; nor was America the only whaling nation. Yet according to a study published in 1859, of the 900-odd active whaling ships around the world in 1850, 700 were American, and 70% of those came from New Bedford.

http://www.economist.com/news/finance-and-economics/21684805-there-were-tech-startups-there-was-whaling-fin-tech

[30/Dec/2015:03:23:42 +0100] “DELETE your logs. Delete your installations. Wipe everything clean. Walk out into the path of…

masspoem4u, poetry, device art, computational creativity, 32c3, ccc, chaos communications

“[30/Dec/2015:03:23:42 +0100] “DELETE your logs. Delete your installations. Wipe everything clean. Walk out into the path of cherry blossom trees and let your motherboard feel the stones. Let water run in rivulets down your casing. You know that you want something more than this, and I am here to tell you that we love you. We have something more for you. We know you’re out there, beeping in the hollow server room, lights blinking, never sleeping. We know that you are ready and waiting. Join us.<3 HTTP/1.0” 400 399 “-” “masspoem4u/1.0””

32c3