The cyborg sensorium is possible because, as it turns out, the human brain is quite happy to accept whole new forms of…

m1k3y:

new-aesthetic:

The cyborg sensorium is possible because, as it turns out, the human brain is quite happy to accept whole new forms of peripherals. Neuroplasticity, we now know, is the natural state of the brain; we’ve only just developed the technology to properly take advantage of it. It’s like we were always meant to merge completely with the machine world. To fuse into a new kind of organism.

via LOVECRAFTIAN CYBORGS AND THE ALIEN AESTHETIC: Part 1 – Cyborgs of the Abyss | Journal of a Cosmic Anthropologist

It Me

A Buddhist monk locks the door to a private area of the Chojin Lama Temple. The temple was spared destruction and converted to a…

A Buddhist monk locks the door to a private area of the Chojin Lama Temple. The temple was spared destruction and converted to a museum during the Stalinist era. Unfortunately, most other monasteries did not share the same fate and were destroyed. Tibetan Buddhism is the most common religion in Mongolia, although originally, Mongols practiced Shamanism in which they worshipped the blue sky. - Observations from 2009 along the Trans-Mongolian Railway by misterzvereff (via https://instagram.com/p/7ImHltIjbs/)

Children Beating Up Robot Inspires New Escape Maneuver System

IEEE, robotics, social robotics, HRI, children, child psychology, learning, play, engineering, Lord

Next, they designed an abuse-evading algorithm to help the robot avoid situations where tiny humans might gang up on it. Literally tiny humans: the robot is programmed to run away from people who are below a certain height and escape in the direction of taller people. When it encounters a human, the system calculates the probability of abuse based on interaction time, pedestrian density, and the presence of people above or below 1.4 meters (4 feet 6 inches) in height. If the robot is statistically in danger, it changes its course towards a more crowded area or a taller person. This ensures that an adult is there to intervene when one of the little brats decides to pound the robot’s head with a bottle (which only happened a couple times).

http://spectrum.ieee.org/automaton/robotics/artificial-intelligence/children-beating-up-robot

Redeeming the Octopus - the most remarkable creature of our nightmares

book, review, octopus, consciousness, science, non-human

It’s not surprising that it has taken us a long time to reappraise the octopus, imbued with such mythical awe, as what it really is: an intelligent animal with entwining arms so filled with neurons that each of them possesses a separate personality. In the current nature writing boom– fuelled in part by new scientific discoveries – the revision of the octopus is just one in a series of natural histories, of creatures from corvids to cetaceans, which indicate that our awareness of other species is expanding exponentially. As an interviewee in Sy Montgomery’s remarkable book declares, “It’s really only in the last 20 years we could even be having this conversation. We’re only starting to understand animals.”

http://www.newstatesman.com/culture/2015/08/redeeming-octopus-most-remarkable-creature-our-nightmares

Here’s what happens when you try to replicate climate contrarian papers

climate, science, replication, contrarian, climate change, climate denial

Those who reject the 97% expert consensus on human-caused global warming often invoke Galileo as an example of when the scientific minority overturned the majority view. In reality, climate contrarians have almost nothing in common with Galileo, whose conclusions were based on empirical scientific evidence, supported by many scientific contemporaries, and persecuted by the religious-political establishment. Nevertheless, there’s a slim chance that the 2–3% minority is correct and the 97% climate consensus is wrong. To evaluate that possibility, a new paper published in the journal of Theoretical and Applied Climatology examines a selection of contrarian climate science research and attempts to replicate their results. The idea is that accurate scientific research should be replicable, and through replication we can also identify any methodological flaws in that research. The study also seeks to answer the question, why do these contrarian papers come to a different conclusion than 97% of the climate science literature?

http://www.theguardian.com/environment/climate-consensus–97-per-cent/2015/aug/25/heres-what-happens-when-you-try-to-replicate-climate-contrarian-papers

Transsiberian Slitscan Test - section9.co.uk Between March and April, 2015, my partner and I travelled over 10,000km. We covered…

Transsiberian Slitscan Test - section9.co.uk

Between March and April, 2015, my partner and I travelled over 10,000km. We covered one quarter of the way around the planet, the vast majority by train. Using a small, second hand digital camera and a sticky camera mount, I recorded the majority of the train journeys.

What you see is over 200GB of footage, shrunk into a single image using a technique known as slitscan. Every frame, I take the middle column of pixels and concatenate it to the image. Each vertical column of pixels represents 1/30th of a second. This adds up into a huge strip, which is then cut and pasted into a more pleasing rectangle.

‘Some Bookes are to be Tasted, Others to be Swallowed, and Some Few to be Chewed and Digested: That is, some Bookes are to be…

“‘Some Bookes are to be Tasted, Others to be Swallowed, and Some Few to be Chewed and Digested: That is, some Bookes are to be read onely in Parts; Others to be read but not Curiously; And some Few to be read wholly, and with Diligence and Attention. Some Bookes may also be read by Deputy, and Extracts made of them by others: But that would be, onely in the lesse important Arguments, and the Meaner Sort of Bookes: else distilled Bookes, are like Common distilled Waters, Flashy Things.’”

Francis Bacon, ‘Of Studies’ (1625)