Posts tagged 2020

Autechre

autechre, listening, music, 2016, 2020, bandcamp

zzkt:

Autechre have created a unique and particular sonic universe, so it’s hard to say what’s best or most representative of their music, and you’ll probably get as many different answers as people you ask. so perhaps a suggested heuristic path…

find elseq (in parts 1,2,3,4,,5 (it’s the most recent and compresses much of their work strangely). chronologically, listen to Eggshell, if you like it get Incunabula. listen to Montreal or Foil if you like them get Amber. listen to Rsdio. just listen to it (and get tri repetae) C/Pach is probably most indicative of where they go next, which is Chiastic Slide. listen to Nuane. listen to Arch Carrier or Corc from LP5. Confield is quite broad, try Uviol or Lentic Catachresis or Parhelic Triangle. from Draft 7.30 listen to Xylin Room or Surripere or IV VV IV VV VIII or Theme Of Sudden Roundabout. from Untilted listen to Sublimit or Augmatic Disport. from Quaristice try IO (mons) or Tankraken. Treale or d-sho qub from Oversteps. from Exai listen to irlite (get 0) or just the whole album. their live material is worth listening to as individual pieces.

(note this just covers their albums, so doesn’t include the various EPs. you can think of the EPs from each period as similar, yet distinct. if you find any particular album interesting chances are you’ll like the other material from around the same period)

(i left out the bit where you open a small door and find a Gescom)

…and since then, the NTS Sessions (part 1,2,3,4) and Sign have been released

To prevent severe climate change we need to rapidly reduce global greenhouse gas emissions. The world emits around 50 billion…

GHG, ghg emissions, climate change, enegry, AR5, IPCC, our world in data, 2016, 2020, Hannah Ritchie

To prevent severe climate change we need to rapidly reduce global greenhouse gas emissions. The world emits around 50 billion tonnes of greenhouse gases each year [measured in carbon dioxide equivalents (CO 2eq)].1

To figure out how we can most effectively reduce emissions and what emissions can and can’t be eliminated with current technologies, we need to first understand where our emissions come from.

In this post I present only one chart, but it is an important one – it shows the breakdown of global greenhouse gas emissions in 2016.2 This is the latest breakdown of global emissions by sector, published by Climate Watch and the World Resources Institute.3,4

The overall picture you see from this diagram is that almost three-quarters of emissions come from energy use; almost one-fifth from agriculture and land use  [this increases to one-quarter when we consider the food system as a whole – including processing, packaging, transport and retail]; and the remaining 8% from industry and waste.

To know what’s included in each sector category, I provide a short description of each. These descriptions are based on explanations provided in the IPCC’s Fifth Assessment Report AR5) and a methodology paper published by the World Resources Institute.5,6

(via https://ourworldindata.org/ghg-emissions-by-sector )

Pablo Stafforini’s Forecasting System

EA, forecasting, futures, emacs, Metaculus, analysis, Elicit, Pablo-Stafforini, 2020

I enjoy forecasting, pretty much in the same way other people enjoy video games, or stamp collecting. It’s also an activity broadly in line with my values. I think the world would be a much better place if people approached predicting the future with the same level of rigor they have when explaining the past. Yet incalculably more books have been written about the past than about the future, and the fact that studying the past is more tractable than studying the future only partly explains this asymmetry. I think most people approach forecasting in what some authors call “far mode”: as an exercise whose primary purpose is not to describe reality accurately, but to signal our aspirations, or something along those lines. However, as Robin Hanson likes to say, the future is just another point in time.


(via https://forum.effectivealtruism.org/posts/w4CM7RfTLXxYLDccX/pablo-stafforini-s-forecasting-system–1)

Hints of life on Venus

RAS, astrobiology, astronomy, venus, life, phosphine, ET, 2020

An international team of astronomers, led by Professor Jane Greaves of Cardiff University, today announced the discovery of a rare molecule – phosphine – in the clouds of Venus. On Earth, this gas is only made industrially, or by microbes that thrive in oxygen-free environments. Astronomers have speculated for decades that high clouds on Venus could offer a home for microbes – floating free of the scorching surface, but still needing to tolerate very high acidity. The detection of phosphine molecules, which consist of hydrogen and phosphorus, could point to this extra-terrestrial ‘aerial’ life. The new discovery is described in a paper in Nature Astronomy.


(via https://ras.ac.uk/news-and-press/news/hints-life-venus)

Why Do So Many People Want Us Back In The Office?

covid-19, office, work, pandemic, change, future-of-work, bizniz, 2020, lockdown

The office as the default way of working is dead. But the office itself isn’t dead. With working from home, what we gain in work-life balance we might lose in innovation and creativity. There are people who could directly challenge that sentence but I suspect they will come from highly mature companies who have fully mastered the remote working learning curve. Many of us are still at the stage of doing what we did in the office , just remotely. The timorous amongst us may use the lack of productivity net gains as a reason to regress rather than push through the ‘pain barrier’ as Matt Mullenweg describes it. We can do so much better, for ourselves, our customers and society if we stop being so frightened or so certain of the future.


(via https://paulitaylor.com/2020/09/12/why-do-so-many-people-want-us-back-in-the-office/)

Gresik residents made to dig graves as punishment for not wearing face masks

Java, Indonesia, gravedigging, covid-19, punishment, mask, wear-a-mask, 2020

Eight people in Gresik regency, East Java, were ordered by local authorities to dig graves for those who have died of COVID-19 as punishment for not wearing face masks in public. Cerme district head, Suyono, said that he punished residents who did not wear face masks by making them dig graves at a public cemetery in Ngabetan village.


(via https://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2020/09/10/gresik-residents-made-to-dig-graves-as-punishment-for-not-wearing-face-masks.html)

A strange phenomenon has emerged near Amazon.com Inc. delivery stations and Whole Foods stores in the Chicago suburbs:…

amazon, AMZN, gig economy, platform capitalism, automation, hacks, tree, unemployment, logisitics, 2020, USA

A strange phenomenon has emerged near Amazon.com Inc. delivery stations and Whole Foods stores in the Chicago suburbs: smartphones dangling from trees. Contract delivery drivers are putting them there to get a jump on rivals seeking orders, according to people familiar with the matter.

Drivers are competing for fast-delivery Instant Offers, which require an immediate response and typically take between 15 and 45 minutes to complete. Instant Offers are dispatched by an automated system that detects which drivers are nearby through their smartphones. When drivers see an Instant Offer, they have only a few minutes to accept the delivery or lose it to someone else.

The system can detect a smartphone’s location to within about 20 feet. That means a phone in a tree outside Whole Foods’ door would get the delivery offer even before drivers sitting in their cars just a block away.

The phones in trees seem to serve as master devices that dispatch routes to multiple nearby drivers in on the plot, according to drivers who have observed the process. They believe an unidentified person or entity is acting as an intermediary between Amazon and the drivers and charging drivers to secure more routes.

“Amazon knows about it,” the driver said, “but does nothing.”


(via Amazon Drivers Are Hanging Smartphones in Trees to Get More Work )

Russian-backed organizations amplifying QAnon conspiracy theories

Russia, USA, QAnon, disinfo, memetic-warfare, 2020

“Though Russia is only one foreign actor capable of targeting US political audiences through the QAnon community, its history of operations appear to be the most ideologically aligned with the overarching QAnon theory,” the report said. “Russia also appears to have made the most effort to gain credibility within the community thus far.” QAnon was named by the FBI as a potential instigator of domestic terrorism, and followers have been charged with making a terror threat, murder and other crimes.


(via https://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-election-qanon-russia/russian-backed-organizations-amplifying-qanon-conspiracy-theories-researchers-say-idUSKBN25K13T)

Renewables generate more energy than fossil fuels in Europe for the first time

energy, renewables, EU, 2020, Ember

Over a fifth of Europe’s energy was generated by solar panels and wind turbines in the first half of 2020. Solar and wind energy generation was higher in some European countries. Denmark came out on top, generating 64 per cent of its energy from these renewable sources, closely followed by Ireland (49 per cent) and Germany (42 per cent), according to the report from independent climate think-tank Ember. In a half-year review released in July by the think tank, all renewables - including wind, solar, hydroelectricity and bioenergy - were found to have exceeded fossil fuel generation for the first time ever. They produced 40 per cent of the EU’s power from January to June with fossil fuels contributing 34 per cent.


(via https://www.euronews.com/living/2020/08/14/renewables-generate-more-energy-than-fossil-fuels-in-europe-for-the-first-time-ever)

I drew the above diagram in my notebook last November, a double allusion. The first is the epigram, "Work as if you live in…

metafoundry, Deb Chachra, the jackpot, better civilization, early days, diagram, 2020

I drew the above diagram in my notebook last November, a double allusion. The first is the epigram, “Work as if you live in the early days of a better nation,” which is generally attributed to the Scottish writer and artist, Alasdair Gray. On digging a little deeper into its provenance, I was startled to learn that the line is borrowed from a poet—and not just any poet, but the much-beloved poet laureate of my Canadian childhood, Dennis Lee, author of Alligator Pie and Garbage Delight. The quotation is from Lee’s poem “Civil Elegies”, and the second pleasant surprise was the wording in the original, which I much prefer [the emphasis here is mine]: “…the early days of a better civilization.”

The second allusion is to William Gibson’s concept of ’the jackpot’, introduced in his 2014 novel The Peripheral and which continues as the backdrop in his 2020 novel, Agency. It’s a multi-causal, distributed, decentralized apocalypse, comprising climate change, pollution, the emergence of drug-resistance diseases and, of course, pandemics. It’s not clear we’re in its early days—in Gibson’s conception, we are a century into a multi-century event. It’s just that it’s taken us this long to realize it.

So. Greetings from the jackpot, and the early days of a better civilization.

(via Deb Chachra, in Metafoundry 73 )

Ethnographers can provide accounts that start from first-person experiences of otherwise-global phenomena, like changing…

ethnography, otherwise-global phenomena, anthropology, Alder Keleman Saxena, Jennifer Lee Johnson, pandemic, 2020

“Ethnographers can provide accounts that start from first-person experiences of otherwise-global phenomena, like changing rainfall patterns and frequent, high-intensity wildfires, and demonstrate how these layer into other lived encounters with sociality and infrastructure, like supply-chain ruptures, ventilator shortages, vaccine distribution, and digital contact tracing.”

Alder Keleman Saxena and Jennifer Lee Johnson (May 2020)

“Recently I was asked by a Finnish foundation to write an article aiming to explain to artists what it would mean not to fly to…

travel, EU, Europa, Covid-19, slow-travel, climate, 2020, culture, arts

“Recently I was asked by a Finnish foundation to write an article aiming to explain to artists what it would mean not to fly to their residencies, called Slow Travel – A Privilege Not A Sacrifice, describing a 3-day journey from rural France to the Saari Residence in Finland, using trains, electric scooters and ships. Within weeks of it being published, artists were either unable to travel to residencies or were stuck in the ones that they were in, because of the restrictions of movement caused by COVID 19. It seems ironic in hindsight that one of the conclusions I drew was “that having travelled by rail and ship many times in one year, I’m also beginning to question the need to travel at all. Slow travel doesn’t mean just substituting a train for a plane, it means changing an entire mindset.” I go on to ask the question “why travel at all?”. Little did I know. Now we have ‘home artists residencies’ and are bewildered by an online melée of endless virtual meetings, remote cocktail parties and non-stop media consumption, what will happen in Europe when we finally get let out?“

(via Makery)

Locust Swarms, Some 3 Times the Size of New York City, Are Eating Their Way Across Two Continents

locusts, plague, 2020

rjzimmerman:

Coronavirus pandemic, locusts in Africa and the Middle East, melting ice in Antarctica and the Arctic, warmest years and seasons ever, floods in the Midwestern US and many other places on Earth, and so on. When do we get to sing “Ding Dong the Witch Is Dead?” I think in November of this year.

Locust Swarms, Some 3 Times the Size of New York City, Are Eating Their Way Across Two Continents

The health and safety of our customers and crew is a priority for Singapore Airlines and SilkAir. In view of the Covid–19…

Singapore Airlines, SIA, COVID-19, health and safety, pandemic, preparedness, public health, 2020

The health and safety of our customers and crew is a priority for Singapore Airlines and SilkAir. In view of the Covid–19 outbreak, we would like to share with you the enhanced cleaning and precautionary measures that we have instituted on board our aircraft.

All SIA and SilkAir aircraft already undergo a thorough cleaning process when on the ground. In addition, all flights arriving from Mainland China undergo disinfectant fogging. Common surfaces such as tray tables, handsets, and inflight entertainment screens are cleaned with disinfectant wipes. We also remove all headsets, headrest covers, pillow covers, bedsheets, and blankets after every flight sector.
The air filtration systems in our aircraft are equipped with High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters, which have a similar performance to those used in hospital operation rooms. Constant airflow also ensures that the cabin air is refreshed every two to three minutes.

During this period, you may also notice that there have been changes to our in-flight services. These include the replacement of the hot towel service with pre-set wet towelettes, cessation of the after take-off drink service, removal of reading materials from seat-back pockets, and suspension of in-flight sales.

Pre-flight temperature screening for all cabin crew and pilots operating out of Singapore has been in place since 29 January 2020. Our crew also know that they should see a doctor immediately if they feel unwell and should not report for work.

Thank you for your support. We wish you good health and look forward to welcoming you on board soon.

Singapore Airlines           

“Why a rotary cellphone? Because in a finicky, annoying, touchscreen world of hyperconnected people using phones they have no…

cellphone, retrofuture, justine haupt, device art, rotary dial, 2020

“Why a rotary cellphone? Because in a finicky, annoying, touchscreen world of hyperconnected people using phones they have no control over or understanding of, I wanted something that would be entirely mine, personal, and absolutely tactile,while also giving me an excuse for not texting.”

(via http://justine-haupt.com/rotarycellphone/ )

“Brief summary of how it works: When the player takes a photo I duplicate the environment, make it greyscale and slice the…

photography, polaroid, games, 3d, beyond photography, mesh, holes, Matt Stark, 2020

video link

“Brief summary of how it works: When the player takes a photo I duplicate the environment, make it greyscale and slice the meshes to remove anything outside the photo. When they place it into the world I slice the environment’s meshes to make a hole for the photo.“


(via Matt Stark)

Big data meets Big Brother as China moves to rate its citizens

social credit score, china, panopticon, nudge, cybersyn, jade mirror, 2017, 2020, Wired

The new system reflects a cunning paradigm shift. As we’ve noted, instead of trying to enforce stability or conformity with a big stick and a good dose of top-down fear, the government is attempting to make obedience feel like gaming. It is a method of social control dressed up in some points-reward system. It’s gamified obedience.

via http://www.wired.co.uk/article/chinese-government-social-credit-score-privacy-invasion