Posts tagged chaos

“In Greek mythology, Erebus /ˈɛrɪbəs, -əb-/, also Erebos (Ancient Greek: Ἔρεβος, Érebos, “deep darkness, shadow” or “covered”),…

chaos, erebus, mythology, greek mythology, classics, darkness, geneology, wikipedia

“In Greek mythology, Erebus /ˈɛrɪbəs, -əb-/, also Erebos (Ancient Greek: Ἔρεβος, Érebos, “deep darkness, shadow” or “covered”), was often conceived as a primordial deity, representing the personification of darkness; for instance, Hesiod’s Theogony identifies him as one of the first five beings in existence, born of Chaos.“

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Erebus

We live in an era of great turbulence, with economic decline running in paradoxical tandem with technological advance. It is…

Brexit, UK, EU, hookland, Irvine Welsh, chaos, change, politics, uncertainty, silver lining, postnormal

“We live in an era of great turbulence, with economic decline running in paradoxical tandem with technological advance. It is only to be expected that our antiquated institutions haven’t been able to keep up, and our nation states, political parties and supranational bodies are starting to unravel. Politicians now seem perennially in the business of chaos management, and the suspicion must be that this process has only just begun. The inevitable chorus of voices crying out for “a period of stability” sadly misses the point: we aren’t at that place in our history, and trying to impose inertia on those fluid times may only be inviting further discord.”

Irvine Welsh,The beauty beneath Brexit’s bedwetting.

The Discipline of Chaos Engineering

Medium, Chaos Engineering, resilience, chaos, fault tolerance, netflix, gremlin

To put it simply, Chaos Engineering is one particular approach to “breaking things on purpose” that aims at teaching us something new about systems by performing experiments on them. Ultimately, our goal is to identify hidden problems that could arise in production. Only then will we be able to address systemic weaknesses and make our systems fault-tolerant. Chaos Engineering goes beyond traditional (failure) testing in that it’s not only about verifying assumptions. It also helps us explore the many unpredictable things that could happen and discover new properties of our inherently chaotic systems.

via https://blog.gremlininc.com/the-discipline-of-chaos-engineering-e39d2383c459

our interpretations of the world are necessary tools for making sense of it, but fixing onto these beliefs as if they revealed…

reality, perception, chaos, Umberto Eco, the nature of things

“our interpretations of the world are necessary tools for making sense of it, but fixing onto these beliefs as if they revealed the true nature of things can be dangerous. The world is always more chaotic than the order our closed systems of signs impose.”

Brent Ables (on the work of Umberto Eco)